Control your DSLR with your iPhone using Shutterbug [Review]

Photo Mar 05, 3 50 02 PMPhotography has always been a hobby of mine, and the iPhone has now come to replace my point-and-shoot camera. But recently I’ve taken to the more professional side of photography, and invested in a DSLR a little less than a year ago. I’ve also taken time to learn as many ins and outs of Photoshop that I can, and have begun doing a little freelance. Doing some research into the field, I’ve heard about remotes to control DSLRs, but always thought it’d be cool to have one that could be controlled by, say, my iPhone, or even iPad. That is where the Shutterbug Remote comes in. Not only does it give me a remote for my DSLR, but it gives me one that can be controlled by my iPhone. That in and of itself makes this worth the price to me, which I should probably mention, is currently $79.99. But if just being able to make your camera take pictures using your iPhone isn’t enough, it also offers up other features that make this worth it.

shutterbugscreenshotThe Shutterbug works connecting via Bluetooth to your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad. Using the Shutterbug Remote application, you can do a lot of different things that make this really well worth it. This also, however, is the area that brought the Shutterbug down a notch or two in my rating. First off, being a developer, I know how easy it is to update a UI for the iPhone 5′s 4-inch Retina display. This app has yet to be updated. That was only me being a little picky, but after just over 5 months, I think the app should be able to take advantage of the iPhone 5′s screen. The features however are awesome. With this, you are able to set timers, and even set up a time lapse. That is what I thought awesome was being able to set a time lapse, as those are the most interesting types of videos (made of many pictures lined up to make a moving video) I have seen. Another feature that was both a plus and minus was the HDR ramp. The reason it is a positive should be obvious, it lets you take the correct exposure pictures that can then be used to create an HDR shot. The reason that this was a minus was that it isn’t very well explained, both in the app and the “quick info” sheet that comes with the device. Once figured out though, it does work just as you’d expect, taking 3 different exposure pictures, one low, one normal, one high, for use in an HDR combining software.

Overall, once you are able to set up your camera how you like it, and get the settings in the Shutterbug application to your liking for what you are attempting to accomplish, this device is a great solution for using your iOS device to control your DSLR. I can, and have, highly recommend this to anyone looking for a way to control your DSLR from an iPhone or iPad. The little things here and there that I mentioned as negatives, in the grand scheme of things, don’t make much of a dent in the usefulness of this awesome little photography companion. For the price, it is worth it. If you are interested, you can buy one here: www.shutterbugremote.com. Tweet me @TiP_Kyle what you think of it if you get one.

Screenshots of all the application tabs:

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  • http://downloadphotoshop.ca/ DownloadPhotos

    For a cheaper option have a look at Triggertrap. Though not technically a remote (it connects to your phone with a cable) the app is free for Android and ios and the hardware is only something like $30. It has a ton of features including a highly confgurable time lapse mode. Very nice interface to boot. Works well with my Nikon.

  • http://blog.shutterbugremote.com/ miznick

    Version 1.2 of the app is now out and fixes some of these issues: full screen support on the iPhone 5 and full screen, native iPad support.

  • camerarec

    @DownloadPhotos Agree, trigger trap is lovely and if you have two devices you can actually do a wireless connection and control http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ae6wibhMmI8